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Fly the Colors!

FLAG FLYING HOLIDAYS

  • 1 January- New Years Day
  • 3rd Monday in January- MLK’s Birthday
  • 20 January- Inauguration Day
  • 12 February- Lincoln’s Birthday
  • 3rd Monday in February- Presidents Day
  • 22 February- Washington’s Birthday
  • Easter Sunday
  • 2nd Sunday in May- Mother’s Day
  • 6 April- Army Day
  • 3rd Saturday in May- Armed Forces Day
  • Last Monday in May- Memorial Day
  • 14 June- Flag Day
  • 3rd Sunday in June- Father’s Day
  • 4 July- Independence Day
  • 27 July- National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day
  • 1st Monday in September- Labor Day
  • 11 September- Patriot Day
  • 17 September- Constitution Day
  • 2nd Monday in October- Columbus Day
  • 27 October- Navy Day (HOOYAH!)
  • 10 November- Marine Corps Birthday
  • 11 November- Veteran’s Day
  • 4th Thursday in November- Thanksgiving
  • 7 November- Pearl Harbor Day
  • 25 December- Christmas Day

Keep an eye out for my post on Flag Etiquette, Care & Guidelines.

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declaration

At What Cost?

by Chauncy Gardener

Something to think about this 4th of July…

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors and tortured before they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.

Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army, another had two sons captured.

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.

What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year, he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later, he died from exhaustion and a broken heart.
Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.

Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution. These were not wild-eyed, rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means and education. They had security, but they valued liberty more.
Standing tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged: “For the support of this declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.”

They gave you and me a free and independent America. The history books never told you a lot about what happened in the Revolutionary War. We didn’t fight just the British. We were British subjects at that time and we fought our own government!

Some of us take these liberties so much for granted, but we shouldn’t.

So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July Holiday and silently thank these patriots. It’s not much to ask for the price they paid.

Remember:
Freedom is never free!

It’s time we get the word out that patriotism is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games.

usflag

I Am Your Flag

“I Am Your Flag”

Traditionalists say I was born of a woman’s hand — fashioned from bits of colored cloth by a seamstress in a small house in Philadelphia, a year after the new country was born.

Historians are less certain of my origin. Yet, no one doubts my existence.
I was created out of necessity to serve as the emblem of a people whose experiment in nationhood was as unique as the arrangement of my stars and stripes.

I have proved my adaptability to change. I’ve accommodated growth.
I’ve stood up to time and troubles. I fluttered in the Fall air with General Washington and his loyal French allies at Yorktown. My fabric was shredded by cannonballs from British frigates

in the War of 1812 and I was carried in triumph by Andy Jackson at New Orleans.
The British could see me clearly in the mists of “dawn’s early light,”
waving from the standards at Fort McHenry.

I’ve witnessed turmoil and bitterness, even lost some of my glory in mid-century in a war between brothers, but I was restored as a nation’s emblem at Appomattox.

I traveled West with the new frontier. I flew from the headlamps of the Iron Horse in Utah. I was with the prospectors at Sutter’s Mill, with the cavalry against cattle rustlers, with the Rough Riders at San Juan Hill.

I crossed the Marne with the doughboys anxious to make the world safe for democracy.

I was with brave GIs storming the beaches at Normandy. I was raised over a shell-pocked hilltop at Iwo Jima and I stood by the grim-faced negotiators at Panmunjom. I was on that last helicopter from Saigon and with the men and women of Operation Desert Storm.

I have been around in victory and defeat. I’ve seen pleasure and pain.

I was raised over the rubble of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
I’ve been folded smartly by soldiers and handed to weeping widows. I’ve covered the coffins of those who’ve served country and community.

I also decorate bandstands and concert halls. I am saluted in parades, in schools and at ball parks.

I am part of political campaigns, high holidays and ice cream socials.
I fly from skyscrapers and bungalows. I’ve been to the moon and the ocean floor.

I am everywhere my people are. I am saluted and, occasionally, scorned. I have been held with pride and I have been ridiculed, because I am everything my people are: proud, angry, happy, sad, vengeful, argumentative, ambitious, indifferent.

I was created to serve a people in struggle and a government in change.
There are now more stars in my blue field than there were in the beginning and, if need be, there’s room for more.

But, those red and white stripes remain as they’ve always remained, clearly visible through the struggle — the symbol of the “land of the free and the home of the brave.”

I am your past. I am your future. I am your flag.

by Bob Nelson KYW Newsradio 1060 Copyright 2002, Infinity Broadcasting Corp.
All Rights Reserved.